Friday’s Post

High-powered businessman Edward Lewis is dumped by his girlfriend during an unpleasant phone call wherein he asked her to escort him during his business trip; she has finally had enough of being treated solely as his “beck and call girl.” Edward is a corporate raider from New York, who buys companies that are in financial trouble and tears them down piece by piece. Leaving a business party in the Hollywood Hills, he takes his lawyer’s Lotus Esprit sports car and accidentally ends up on Hollywood Boulevard in the city’s red-light district, where he encounters prostitute Vivian Ward. As he is having difficulties driving the car, she gets in and guides him to the Regent Beverly Wilshire Hotel, where he is staying. It becomes clear that Vivian knows more about the Lotus than he does, and he lets her drive. Vivian charges Lewis $20 for the ride, and they separate. She goes to a bus stop, where he finds her and offers to hire her for the night; the next day, he asks Vivian to play the role his girlfriend has refused, offering her $3000 to stay with him for the next six days as well as to buy her a new, more acceptable wardrobe. That evening, going to a business dinner, Edward is visibly moved by Vivian’s transformation brought about by the helpful manager of the hotel and begins seeing Vivian in a different light. He begins to open up to her, revealing details about his personal and business lives.

Edward takes Vivian to a polo match in hopes of networking for his business deal. His attorney, Phillip, suspects Vivian is a corporate spy, and Edward tells him how they truly met. Phillip later approaches Vivian, suggesting they do business once her work with Edward is finished. Insulted, and furious that Edward has revealed their secret, Vivian wants to end the arrangement. Edward apologizes and admits to feeling jealous of a business associate – whom she had met at the previous night’s dinner – to whom Vivian paid attention at the match. Vivian’s straightforward personality is rubbing off on Edward, and he finds himself acting in unaccustomed ways. Clearly growing involved, Edward takes Vivian by private jet to see La Traviata at the San Francisco Opera. Vivian is moved to tears by the story of the prostitute who falls in love with a rich man. She breaks her “no kissing on the mouth” rule and they have sex; in the afterglow, believing Edward is asleep, Vivian admits she loves him, and as she drifts off, Edward opens his eyes. Edward offers to put her up in an apartment so she can be off the streets. Hurt, she refuses and says this is not the “fairy tale” she dreamed of as a child, in which a knight on a white horse rescues her.

Meeting with the tycoon whose shipbuilding company he is in the process of raiding, Edward changes his mind. His time with Vivian has shown him a different way of looking at life, and he suggests he and the tycoon work together to save the company rather than tearing it apart and selling off the pieces. Phillip, furious at losing so much money, goes to the hotel to confront Edward but finds only Vivian. Blaming her for the change in Edward, he attempts to rape her. Edward arrives, wrestles Philip off her, punches him in the face, and throws him out of the room.

With his business in L.A. complete, Edward asks Vivian to stay one more night with him, but because she wants to, not because he’s paying her. She refuses. Edward re-thinks his life, and as he’s leaving for the airport to return to New York, he instead has the hotel chauffeur detour to Vivian’s apartment building, where he leaps from the white limousine’s sun roof and “rescues her”, overcoming his extreme fear of heights to ascend her fire escape. Edward asks, “So what happens after he climbed up the tower and rescues her?” Vivian responds, “She rescues him right back.” Vivian and Edward kiss.

Can’t believe we are almost at the end of May!!

Did some gardening in Kim’s little plot, need some colour and it’s fifty shades of Green!! The roses are coming along, not as tall as last year.

Family Bingo Night and Grace insisted she needed a card.

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